Emergency Care for a Fever

Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at Swedish Medical Center

If your child has a mild fever, it generally can be treated at home with rest, over the counter medications and rest. Sometimes, however, a fever is indicative of a more serious infection. If your child has a fever, it is usually a good idea to call your pediatrician before heading to the ER. If your pediatrician is unavailable, consider the following guidelines. 

Babies Younger than Three Months

If your baby is younger than three months old and the temperature is over 100.4, visit the pediatric ER.  Additionally, seek emergency care if your child's fever is accompanied by these symptoms: 

  • Difficulty to wake up to feed
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Inconsolable or non-stop crying 
  • Rash
  • Vomiting

Babies and Toddlers Three Months to Three Years

If your baby is between the aes of three months and three years and his/her temperature is more than 102.2, visit the pediatric ER. Additionally, seek emergency care if your child's fever is accompanied by these symptoms:

  • Difficulty to rouse
  • Unable to keep fluids down
  • Not urinating
  • Inconsolable
  • Not up to date on immunizations
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Rash 

Children Ages Three and Older

If your child is over the age of three and his/her temperature is more than 102 for two or more days, visit the pediatric ER. Additionally, seek emergency care if the fever is accompanied by these symptoms:

  • Difficult to rouse
  • Abdominal pain
  • Unable to keep fluids down
  • Burning during urination
  • Not urinating
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Rash
  • Stiff neck
  • Not up to date on immunizations 

Swedish Pediatric Emergency Care