Talk with your doctor about epilepsy. Talking openly and often with your doctor can help you make the best choices.

Here are some tips that will help:

  • Bring someone with you. It helps to have one more person hear what is said and think of things to ask.
  • Write your questions so you do not forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get and make sure you grasp what you are hearing. Ask for help if you need to.
  • Do not be afraid to ask your questions or ask where you can find out more. You have a right to know.
  • What causes it?
  • Does having a seizure mean that I have it?
  • What are the health problems that could happen?
  • Can it cause death?
  • Can I lower my risk?
  • One of my parents has epilepsy. Does that mean I will get it too?
  • Is medicine the best way to treat my epilepsy?
  • Will I have to take it for the rest of my life?
  • How will it help? What side effects might happen?
  • Medicine is not helping me. Are there other things I can try?
  • When should I think about surgery as a choice?
  • Can surgery cause other problems with my brain?
  • What is the success rate?
  • Which surgery is best for me?
  • What are the health problems I could have from it?
  • Are there any other therapies that I should think about getting?
  • Are there things that I do that I may have to stop doing?
  • What are the rules about driving? Will I be able to drive?
  • Will I be able to work?
  • Do I have to tell my boss?
  • Is it safe for me to get pregnant?
  • Is it okay to take birth control pills and seizure medicine?
  • Will my seizure medicine cause problems with my other medicines?
  • How well does medicine control epilepsy?
  • Can I live a normal life on medicine?
  • Can I live a normal life after surgery?
  • Are there support groups for people and their loved ones?

Revision Information

  • Reviewer: EBSCO Medical Review Board Rimas Lukas, MD
  • Review Date: 03/2019 -
  • Update Date: 03/26/2019 -